In the News

November 2013

31 October 2013, Belfast Telegraph
The inventor of the World Wide Web has said governments and companies "must not shy away" from giving the public free access to sensitive information.
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November 2013

by David Meyer, 29 Oct
The UK’s Open Data Institute, which exists to help the government make its data open and machine-readable, and to incubate private open data companies, has spawned a series of nodes around the world.
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October 2013

Chief executive Gavin Starks explains how the open data evangelist is making change happen globally.  Jane Dudman, The Guardian,

Tuesday 22 October 2013
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October 2013

We need more data about open data if the government initiative is to succeed.  The Guardian, Professor Helen Margett,

Tuesday 22 October 2013
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October 2013

Submitted by Swalker
The Government of Canada remains committed to fostering the principles of Open Government. It offers Canadians greater opportunities to learn about and participate in government, in the economy, and in our democratic process.

The Honourable Tony Clement, President of the Treasury Board of Canada
 
Government as a platform is a concept that was popularized in 2010 by Tim O’Reilly and other government technology leaders. The idea stresses that governments, big and small, can provide or become a platform that enables the public to build on existing government resources. This concept is most commonly contrasted with the analogy of government as a vending machine, whereby citizens pay taxes and get services in return, having little opportunity to interact with government in a more meaningful way.
 
The notion of government as a platform provides an exciting conceptual framework for implementing Open Government initiatives world-wide. Through the development of these Open Government initiatives, both Canada and the UK have recognized the potential of previously untapped information and resources. This new train of thought can significantly enhance the way government operates and provides services. Although change is imminent, the current challenge is to find common sense solutions to eliminating the cultural stigma of government operating as a vending machine, and to smoothly transition into a collaborative workforce­.
 
As part of our Open Government initiatives, both Canada and the UK have released hundreds of thousands of open datasets, hosted public consultations, and implemented an Open Government licence that can be used by governments nationwide, enabling the public to reuse the information in a straightforward and standardized way. Still, with these milestones achieved, there is much we can improve upon.
 
Evident through our involvement in the Open Government Partnership and the G8, both countries have been, and will continue to be, committed to international collaboration. As the relationship between Canada and the UK remains one that is unmatched, it provides a unique opportunity for additional collaboration. This type of bilateral partnership greatly benefits both governments in building and delivering on their specific open agendas.
 
An example of this collaboration took place on October 11th, during the Transatlantic Google Hangout. Canada’s President of the Treasury Board, Tony Clement, and Canadian app developer, Sam Vermette were joined by Sir Nigel Shadbolt, Chairman of the Open Data Institute, and Paul Maltby, the UK Director of Open Data and Transparency and Open Data entrepreneurs, to discuss how Open Data is being used to benefit citizens in terms of productivity, improved quality of life and cost savings.
 
Continuing this type of communication and collaboration helps to further advance our Open Government agenda and address the necessity of public service reform. It is imperative that government employees, who collect and use data and information, are empowered to become proactive agents. We must encourage the public service to explore and engage with citizens on how to share, reuse, and repurpose public sector information.
 
Policies and directives are key, but require solid implementation plans for success. If we want to meet the expectations of the public, we will have to expect more of ourselves.
 
This fall, the Government of Canada (GC) will release its Directive on Open Government, defining more clearly than ever before, the obligation that employees have to deliver open data, open information, and open dialogue to Canadians. In addition, our Blueprint 2020 initiative further challenges employees to envision the future of the public service. In the UK, the government has already started to address this need for culture change in the 2012 Open Data White Paper: Unleashing the Potential.
 
By working together, we can strengthen our ability to find new ways to harness the power of the public service. Our new public service needs to be more creative and proactive in releasing data, and in building relationships which optimize the use of that data. These relationships help to bridge the transitional gap of cultural change that is needed to spur opportunity for innovation, and to revamp how the government provides high quality services to its citizens.
 
Stephen WalkerSenior Director, Open Government and Information Management

-The Honourable Tony Clement, President of the Treasury Board, hosted a "Google Hangout" on October 11, engaged in a half hour live-stream discussion with Sam Vermette (Co-Founder of the Transit App), Sir Nigel Shadbolt (Chairman and Co-Founder of the Open Data Institute), and Paul Maltby (Director of Open Data and Government Innovation in the Cabinet Office of the UK) , to discuss what is happening in the United Kingdom (UK) and Canada to support open data for businesses and innovators. If you missed the live stream, you can still watch the Google Hangout
http://data.gov.uk/blog/now-is-the-time-to-collaborate-on-cultural-change
 

October 2013

A free event hosted by data.ac.uk will be held on 25 October 2013 which will provide a valuable insight into how easily your University can follow Open Data methodology.  This training workshop follows on from the success of our 'Managing research data with linked data' event in July and will be of interest to anyone keen to learn about the application of open data and how it can be successfully used with the equipment sharing agenda.

The four main learning outcomes will be:

  1. Understanding basic principles of rdf/linked open data
  2. Creating and publishing your own dataset
  3. Enabling discovery of your dataset (the OPD)
  4. Gaining an overview of aggregation - the sky's the limit!

The development of equipment.data.ac.uk is funded by EPSRC in response to the need to improve visibility and utilisation of research equipment. Relatively simple technology enables searching across all published UK HE research equipment databases through one aggregation portal, allowing greater accessibility with the aim to improve efficiency and stimulate greater collaboration in the sector.

To book your space visit Eventbrite

Data.ac.uk is a community led initiative which is a landmark site for academia providing a single point of contact for linked open data development. It enables access to, and the creation of, large aggregated data sets providing powerful and flexible information portals, which includes equipment.data.ac.uk, the UK research equipment portal.

September 2013

The big data product market will grow by 26% per year through until 2018, according to a report - Business Technology
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August 2013

Closing date reminder - 4th Sept. University of Southampton is looking to recruit a skilled Web & Open Data Developer to join their team to support the equipment.data.ac.uk project.
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August 2013

The OKF has launched an Australian Chapter to push for greater public access to data held by governments, businesses, and researchers - ZDNet
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August 2013

Three Philippine provinces are participating in an open government data research project to study if online sharing of governance information can impact local government systems - Asia Pacific futureGOV
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